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KnowledgeBase --> Wine Articles --> Aging Times
Aging Times

Aging Times

A misconception that exists by consumers is that all wines must be aged. This is simply not true. When you buy a wine, it is ready to be consumed. However, there are some wines that will mature over a period of aging, bringing out more character and complexity.

The following is meant to be a guideline to help you decide how long to age a wine. There are a lot of factors that can affect the aging of a wine, such as quality of the wine, and level of sulfites contained within it. Therefore you should think of this as more of a suggestion than a rule.

Higher quality wines will age longer and better than lower quality wines. Wines with more sulfites will last longer as well. Sulfites can be thought of nature’s preservative.

Beaujolais: 0-3 years
Beaujolais Nouveau: drink when purchased
Bordeaux, Red: 7-12 years
Bordeaux, White: 4-10 years
Cabernet Sauvignon, lower quality: 5-6 years
Cabernet Sauvignon, higher quality: 7-15 years
Champagne, non-Vintage: 0-2 years
Champagne, Vintage: 5-10 years
Chianti: 0-5 years
Chardonnay: 0-5 years
Merlot, lower quality: 3-4 years
Merlot, higher quality: 5-12 years
Gewurztraminer: 0-4 years
Port, non-vintage, tawny: 0-5 years
Port, Vintage: 10-20 years or longer
Riesling: 3-4 years
Rioja: 5-10 years
Syrah/Shiraz: 3-5 years
Vouvray: 0-5 years
Zinfandel, Red: 5-10 years
Zinfandel, White: 0-1 years




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